Need Site Support?

Please contact the staff through the site's Contact Us form.

Dpar's Airborne School Journal

Airborne, Air Assault, Pathfinder, Ranger, ROP, Special Forces, etc.
User avatar
skasif11
CPT
CPT
Posts: 827
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:00 am
Contact:

Postby skasif11 Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:09 pm

Thanks to DPAR and nspreitler for their insight. I'm heading to ABN School in a few weeks and it was good to re-read their posts. Seems like it's a school that doesn't change much from year-to-year.
Class 02-10, HHC Commander, 492d Civil Affairs Battalion
User avatar
sapper307
CPT
CPT
Posts: 323
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:00 am
Location: JTFB Honduras
Contact:

Postby sapper307 Wed Aug 31, 2016 11:47 pm

Thanks to DPAR and nspreitler for their insight. I'm heading to ABN School in a few weeks and it was good to re-read their posts. Seems like it's a school that doesn't change much from year-to-year.
In January it will have been 20 years since I graduated, reading DPAR's journal it hasn't changed much since '97.
User avatar
skasif11
CPT
CPT
Posts: 827
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:00 am
Contact:

Postby skasif11 Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:44 am

I'm all set to graduate on Friday, and after re-reading the day-to-day, not much has changed.

The black hats are very knowledgeable, and know their stuff. All of the pomp and circumstances surrounding the training is a bit underwhelming. We constantly sat around for hours on end waiting for cadre to rehearse, rehearse, and rehearse...then double time to an area to get said "memorized" training. I got more out of just talking to the instructors and getting them off of reciting the memorized pages upon pages of instruction that they have to do.

There is a lot of running, but after the first few days of running from point A to point B, just to wait around for what seems like forever got old pretty quickly. The Cadre never really seemed to know what was going on. You'd ask on of your PLT Cadre what we were doing next, or when the next formation was and they'd say one thing...another Cadre would say another...and we'd end up doing neither. Being an Ops guy, the whole course was a mess.

With that said, we did get to do everything that one would normally do at school that most classes don't get the chance to do. We did the 250' tower, and conducted a night jump.

There was a low injury rate overall during jump week (I think we only lost about 10 pax), but it seemed like every time I landed on the DZ, there was an ambulance carting someone away. The most serious injury was someone breaking their femur and hip on the first jump. As long as you do what the instructors tell you (knees and feet together; keep your eyes on the horizon), your landing should be fine.

Experienced ABN SMs I spoke to before attending told me that the T-11 is a good chute, but catching a slip/steering is useless, and I can attest to that, as I and many of my classmates found that no matter which slip we pulled, we just went where ever the wind wanted to take us.

Officers and NCOs definitely get treated much better than the lower enlisted.

I think my main critique of the course was that there were plenty of instructors that clearly did not like their jobs. Many were unprofessional, and commonly referred to the lower enlisted as expletives as opposed to "Airborne".

Either way, I'm glad I came...the past three weeks seemed extremely long, but about 90% of my time there was spent running somewhere, sitting in the hot sun, and only about 10% was actually performing the PEs.

One stark change that I noticed, was that if you live off post or at the hotel, you still have to report every Saturday/Sunday for a 0700 recall formation. And they don't mess around when they tell you not to drink alcohol. If you miss a recall formation (those in the barracks also have a 2200 formation every weekend night), and/or if you smell like alcohol for a formation, they will boot you without giving it a second thought. The class that graduated before mine lost 5 pax the morning of graduation, because they missed their recall formation and were drunk when they came back.

Some beneficial things incoming students should bring are the following:
ACH pads, chin strap, and your own canteen. I believe Dpar mentioned these, but it's worth mentioning again. The canteen they issue you doesn't get cleaned (I went to the tactical store at the PX and bought a new one for $4). The helmet pads don't get washed, and the same for the chin strap.

Strap in for a lot of waiting around (last night of jumps, my chalk sat in our combat equipment harnesses for 5 hours before getting to load in, and 4 hours waiting for our night jump), and less than stellar instruction. Talk to the black hats on the side to get specific questions answered, I got more out of talking to them about things than listening to the instructors.

Feet and knees together!
Class 02-10, HHC Commander, 492d Civil Affairs Battalion

Return to “Schools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests